FAQs

A: There are no membership fees and we only charge artists 15% per sale they get in our store and on requests not including PayPal fees. This rate lowers to as low as 6% as you earn more experience on the site. To soften the fees, we use our PayPal fee schedule so that artists can take advantage of our lower rates. We believe that if you don't get paid then neither should we.

A: Yes, we definitely understand that. The great news is that as you earn more jamps (Jammio experience points) and sell more song licenses, the Jammio rate can drop to as low as 6%. Please see the jamp schedule for more details.

A: Click "Music" > "Post Song or Jam Item" on the menu. From there it will give you the option of posting your own lyrics, instrumental, sound, or song. Once you have posted it, you may edit it by clicking the pencil on the "My Songs and Jam Items" page which is also under Music menu.

A: This feature is coming soon. For now, it just has previously featured artists.

A: We pay out at least once each week using your PayPal Email Address. Every Wednesday night at 11:59 PM Central Time. There is no minimum payout amount. We don't hold your money past one week unless we have to do something like send you a check and that's very rare. If you are in a country that PayPal doesn't support we will send you a check once every 3 months.

Click here to see PayPal Supported Countries

A: Nope, not really. We say not really because by uploading a song, you do give us the right to play the song royalty free to users of the site since it's for your own promotional use or to get it licensed. We are not a radio station, but we're a gig finding and music licensing service. So as far as your actual song ownership, we get nothing.

A: You sure are. We don't force any exclusivity.

Jamps are Jammio Experience Points. They are earned when users make significant contributions to the Jammio community. You can get them by voting on songs, creating requests and collaborations, uploading music you've created to your portfolio, or sending the Jammio team suggestions or bug reports for the site. You can see a full list of the activities that earn Jamps in the "How do I get more Jamps?" section of this FAQ.

The table below lets you know what each activity earns in Jamps. The more valuable it is to the Jammio community, the more Jamps you earn.

TaskPoints
Logging in50
Voting on a song or blog50
Leaving a song, blog, or profile comment250
Getting a like on your song500
Posting to your Jammio blog500
Gaining a new fan1,000
Selling a song through Jammio1,000
Uploading to your portfolio1,000
Reviewing a user after a Jammio request1,000
Submitting to a Jammio collab request2,500
Creating a Jammio Request2,500
Submitting to a Jammio paid gig request5,000
Completing a Jammio collab request (artist and requester)10,000
Referring a new user through the share links10,000
Reporting a site bug, suggestion, or testimonial10,000+
Completing a Jammio paid gig request (artist and requester)15,000
Early User Registration Bonus20,000

*Please remember that you must be logged in to get credit for your Jamps

If you find something is missing that you feel should get rewarded, send us an email with the contact form at the bottom of the page, and you will be awarded 10,000 Jamps for helping us find it! That is, assuming it's legit. We can't be too crazy giving out our Jamps you know :)

There are 6 Jamp experience levels which are listed below.
Everytime you reach a new level you earn a gift certificate or more site privileges.

LevelMinimum PointsPrize
Opening Act0All the benefits of a FREE Jammio Membership of course!
Headliner25,0005 GB of Portfolio Space
Jammio Star100,00010 GB of Portfolio Space and 10% Jammio Rate
Jammio Superstar250,00050 GB of Portfolio Space and 8% Jammio Rate
Jammio Genius1,000,0006% Jammio Rate
Jammio Legend5,000,000Secret Prize

A: Initially your music profile only allows for 1 GB of total song space but can increase the more active you become on Jammio to 5 GB, 10GB, or 50GB. We do this to conserve disk space and to make sure every artist puts up only their best representative work and to give our users an incentive to contribute back to the Jammio community.

A: Tagging is the process of "watermarking" audio. Typically, a tastefully crafted (on-beat) audio loop is placed on a track so that it cannot be removed without damaging the source material. It is used to combat theft in the online music industry.

A: No, but it is suggested that you tag songs that are instrumentals before uploading to your portfolio to prevent theft.

A: If you do not see your genre on the website please use the contact us form with the topic being "Suggestions". In the form please list the Genre name, any sub-genres, and any examples of the genre. We will begin investigating the genre and hopefully add it to our database.

A: The following list can be uploaded ...

A:

  • Audio Engineer - Normally used for mixing and mastering recordings or studio work.
  • Band or DJ - Usually used to play music at an event or gig
  • Instrument Player - Also known as an instrumentist. This person plays an instrument.
  • Music Producer (Or Composer) - Used for people who write instrumental music, or arrange it. Often create beats and instrumentals.
  • Music Supervisor - Used for people who need music in their video, film, tv or internet show.
  • Music Teacher - Used for people looking to learn how to play an instrument or sing.
  • Singer (or Vocalist) - Anyone who lays down vocals for a track. This is everything from a classical opera singer to a hip hop artist.
  • Songwriter (Writer and Lyricist) - Person who writes the lyrics for songs or the musical composition of the song.
  • Sound Designer - Used for people who need custom sound effects.
  • Voice Actor - Used for people who need any voice overs.

A: As the site grows, more talent will be made available to you. Be sure that the price for the request is fair. Each request defaults to a standard minimum pay for that type of artist. Asking someone to provide all vocals on a track for a cheap price is not fair to the artist nor is it representative of the quality you want for your product.

A: Yes. If a dispute arises a fair compromise is sought for both parties. This is why it is imperative that the majority of communications with the artist are done through the Jammio website. However, after you have released funds to an artist you can not get a refund because the release funds action signifies that you got everything you need from the artist.

A: The majority of communications should be done through the Jammio website. This ensures that if any dispute arises a third party can verify all claims made by either party. It is essential that all final products or digital deliverables (mp3 files, etc) be added to the jam session page for your request.

A: No not currently but please use discretion because you can be flagged for abuse if you spam the system with repeat requests or anything similar.

A: It is not recommended that you post too much of your work in a request that you make. For instance, if you need a singer to sing some lyrics that you wrote, we recommend only posting a snippet of the lyrics and not the whole song or maybe a 30 second clip of the instrumental.

A:

The default request time length is 30 days for it to be displayed on our request search engine. You can close it earlier if you like by going to your "Gigs" > "Requests" on the menu and clicking the remove button.

Jamps are Jammio Experience Points. They are earned when users make significant contributions to the Jammio community. You can get them by voting on songs, creating requests and collaborations, uploading music you've created to your portfolio, or sending the Jammio team suggestions or bug reports for the site. You can see a full list of the activities that earn Jamps in the "How do I get more Jamps?" section of this FAQ.

The table below lets you know what each activity earns in Jamps. The more valuable it is to the Jammio community, the more Jamps you earn.

TaskPoints
Logging in50
Voting on a song or blog50
Leaving a song, blog, or profile comment250
Getting a like on your song500
Posting to your Jammio blog500
Gaining a new fan1,000
Selling a song through Jammio1,000
Uploading to your portfolio1,000
Reviewing a user after a Jammio request1,000
Submitting to a Jammio collab request2,500
Creating a Jammio Request2,500
Submitting to a Jammio paid gig request5,000
Completing a Jammio collab request (artist and requester)10,000
Referring a new user through the share links10,000
Reporting a site bug, suggestion, or testimonial10,000+
Completing a Jammio paid gig request (artist and requester)15,000
Early User Registration Bonus20,000

*Please remember that you must be logged in to get credit for your Jamps

If you find something is missing that you feel should get rewarded, send us an email with the contact form at the bottom of the page, and you will be awarded 10,000 Jamps for helping us find it! That is, assuming it's legit. We can't be too crazy giving out our Jamps you know :)

There are 6 Jamp experience levels which are listed below.
Everytime you reach a new level you earn more site privileges.

LevelMinimum PointsPrize
Opening Act0All the benefits of a FREE Jammio Membership of course!
Headliner25,0005 GB of Portfolio Space
Jammio Star100,00010 GB of Portfolio Space and 10% Jammio Rate
Jammio Superstar250,00050 GB of Portfolio Space and 8% Jammio Rate
Jammio Genius1,000,0006% Jammio Rate
Jammio Legend5,000,000Secret Prize

Artists and Repertoire is responsible for talent scouting and artist development
An agent is a representative of an artist who normally helps get them booked for gigs
An author is the creator of any creative work. Songwriters, lyricists, composers are all considered authors. Singers are not necessarily authors.
The 3 largest music labels are Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, and Warner Music Group. All other labels are often considered indie.
A license that groups together a bunch of licenses for convenience. Like when a radio station asks for a license to a whole catalog of music. No one wants to go through and sign a bunch of individual license contracts. Their hands would hurt.
A business manager takes care of all the business stuff artists hate like accounting and stuff so that we artists can stick to what we do best. At least that is how it is supposed to be.
You need a mechanical license anytime you want to re-record or record for the first time a song someone else made. In the US, you can get one of these without dealing with the actual songwriter directly by going through the Harry Fox Agency for an already approved royalty price set by law.

You get one as soon as you create something but need to protect your rights legally by registering it. There are essentially 5 rights you get when you create something:

  1. Right to make copies
  2. Right to distribute and profit from
  3. Right to perform live or on a recording
  4. Right to create a derivative work
  5. Right to display the song in print via sheet music or a lyric sheet.

More than one person can hold a copyright if it was a collaborated effort. Also there are two basic types of copyrights in music, one to the musical work itself (words and the music) and the other to the actual recording. Songwriters, composers, and publishers own the first one while mostly record labels own the second one.

This is a collection of rough sample music by an artist. It's normally not long enough to be a full album. Record labels frown on actually rough songs and prefer already polished songs more now.
When you have changed, remixed, or significantly altered a song enough that it is a different song, that is a derivative work. Weird Al Yankovich made a career of this with his spoofs.
This is the sending out of digital copies of music in any file format (WAV, MP3, etc). Tunecore is a good example of digital distribution.
These are guys who get your music onto store shelves both physical and digital.
This is a way to get paid on a gig where you get a cut from the cover price at the door of a venue. This is normally in the event that you can prove you are mainly responsible for the traffic the venue is getting. Everybody came to hear you right?
This is where a copyright owner gives up their copyright to someone else (usually for a very large fee). Basically you no longer own the rights to the work but they own it now meaning you can't profit from it anymore. Sometimes online music producers do this with their instrumentals because it generates a lot of income in a lump sum.
It's not as bad as you think. An exploited song is one that has been shopped around so that it can make money for you. This is music lingo for monetizing your song.
In the US they are the number one agency for handling mechanical licenses and mechanical royalty payouts.
An independent artist is by all means an entrepreneur of music. Normally not signed by any label but if they are it's an indie label.
Any label that is not represented by the Big Four is considered an indie label.
Anyone who plays an instrument such as that drummer you need or a saxophonist.
In the definition for copyright we mentioned that there are two types of copyrights under the music umbrella one of which has to do with the actual recording itself. This is the official name of that specific recorded version of a song.
You need a mechanical license anytime you want to re-record or record for the first time a song someone else made. This includes instrumentals. This the official name of when an artist leases an instrumental or beat from a producer.
An organization that helps songwriters and composers get paid for their mechanical royalties. The Harry Fox Agency is the biggest one in the US.
This is what you get paid when someone sells copies of their music using your beats, lyrics, or songs. If you write your own songs you might want to register with the Harry Fox Agency. Cha Ching!
This refers to the copyrighted musical composition (the words and the music), not the actual recording.
Any audio on physical media like CDs, DVDs, 8-track tapes, LPs, or cassettes and knowing what all of those media are dates you pretty bad.
These are typically not-for-profit organizations that help songwriters get paid their performance royalties by monitoring radio stations, venues, and tv for their song. If you are songwriter you should register with one of these. ASCAP is the most popular one in the US but there is a list of others for each country.
This is what a songwriter or composer gets paid when someone streams, broadcasts, or even performs their song live in a venue or on a tv, the internet, or a radio station.
This is what a radio station or a band wanting to cover your song would need to get from you to play it.
Public Relations is the group of people responsible for getting you connected with your fans. Our advice in the indie world is make sure you know how to connect and build your fanbase yourself through your own marketing.
If someone wants to display your sheet music or lyrics anywhere they may pay you a print royalty to do so. An example would be if someone wanted to include your song in a piano lessons book they are making. They would pay some small percentage of their sales to you.
A music producer is responsible for governing the overall sound of your music. They make it come together through the special effects used or the instrumentation. Well established producers typically do much more than just make beats.
A promoter is anyone who advertises your music to the fans. This can be as simple as putting up your posters for your next album or as hard as figuring out how you China is gonna know about your song.
A publisher is normally an organization that works on the behalf of a songwriter or composer. They publish your music to people to get it exploited. Many songwriters have learned that it is good to be a co-publisher and have raised their income from their songs by 50% that way.
They help you get your song on the radio. They normally work with labels and publishers to get that done.
This is what a songwriter or composer gets when other people pay them to share some of the rights they get as the copyright holder. It is basically the payment for a license to use their song.
Anybody who is not with the actual artist who helps them play a song in a studio session. That's background singers, drummers, and the like. They probably get paid by an hourly rate and might be asked to help on a tour or concert if they are good.
Any individual or organization that tries to get someone else to pay you to use the song you wrote. They shop it around so your song doesn't sit on the shelf with no one to sing it.
This is normally the guy at the mixing board during a live performance making sure the sound quality and sound system are working properly. The same goes for the studio, but they may also help polish a rough recording with digital editing. They may be the difference between an amateur sound quality song and a hit. They don't however, work magic and fix bad music. That's your job.
This another publishing arm that helps a publisher get exposure where they normally can't. An example would be a US publisher using a publisher in the UK to push your song there.
Anytime any audio is synched with a visual then it is a synchronization. Even if it's a video game. What would Super Mario Brothers have been without that soundtrack?
If a big Hollywood producer, a video game designer, or a tv show producer wants to use your music in their next project. They will need to get one of these from you. Typically it costs some small 1-3% percentage of their overall budget.
These are the technical specifications for the equipment you need to setup for a gig. If you have a certain to setup your sound system this would be the place to describe it.